Tuesday, 25 March 2008

Le serpent noir à collier rouge.


Le serpent noir à collier rouge; (il a vraiment le ventre rouge); bien que ce soit moins venimeux que certains de nos autres serpents, il est tout à fait commun et peut être vu près des sources d'eau qui, dans la sécheresse actuelle, rend ces créatures plus stressants qu'ordinaire.
Ce petit serpent bronzait sur la route entre Bull Creek et Ashbourne quand nous nous sommes retournés pour dire, 'Salut'! Malheureusement il n'était dans aucune humeur de communiquer; quelqu'un l'avait déjà passé sur.
The Red Bellied Black Snake.
Although it's less venomous than some of our other snakes, is quite common and can be seen close to sources of water which, in the current drought, makes these creatures more stressed than usual.
This little snake was basking in the sun on the road between Bull Creek and Ashbourne when we turned around to say, 'Howdy' ! Unfortunately he was in no mood to communicate; someone had already run over him.

14 comments:

dive said...

That's make a cool belt. Don't say you left it there!

M.Benaut said...

Heck, Dive !
Why didn't I think of that first.
I probably thought that like a headless chook, he might have still retained that biting feeling.

oldmanlincoln said...

Oh my that is too bad. I remember when I was growing up that we would see snakes crossing the roads and people would steer their cars to run over them. Now, I hate that they did that. Snakes are so important to the food chain. I hope this one managed, somehow to survive and get off the road and get into some water or around water. It is a very important snake and not unlike the blue racer my father experienced in my post.

I hope you have a nice week.

Abraham Lincoln in Brookville, Ohio.

lynn said...

Oh i feel sorry about that, even though he's a scary thing. Do you think he might have mended himself and lived on?

M.Benaut said...

Nup !!
He sort of needed a puncture repair kit.
It was sad, but he had had a good life.
Sorry, Lynn.

Jilly said...

My God, he's dead. He doesn't look dead, does he? So sorry to hear that. Snakes are beautiful creatures.

lynn said...

Oh M et Mme you simply MUST see today's Paris DP....sigh....:)

lynn said...

Oh. Just read your comment. Oh that's sad. Still, he had a long and scary life.

CaBaCuRl said...

Look I know snakes are protected species in our Wide Brown Land, but who protects us, is what i want to know! Aren't red bellies something important in the 'attempted' control of cane toads? But i don't suppose you have those ugly brutes in SA.. Hope you are enjoying the considerably cooler weather.

Michael said...

LOL! I thought at first "how did he get so close to film it?" but then, alas, the secret is told.

Dive, you crack me up! Always!

I love these wild animal shots you give us from downunder. It helps me see what different things exist in the world...another reason why the DP phenomena works.

Mme Benaut said...

This particular red bellied black snake was just a youngster. The one I saw in our garden a couple of weeks ago was about three times it's size. One loud shout and it went away. They are not aggressive snakes though and will only strike if they are provoked. If bitten and without treatment, one could lose a limb. Still, it scared the living daylights out of me at the time.
These snakes prefer a moist environment. This one was headed for the creek. Sadly (or not) it didn't make it.

Destitute Rebel said...

its a beautiful animal, in the picture it doesnt look dead. Nice picture.

Nathalie said...

Brilliant photo, I thought it was alive too! And I thought you were very brave. I've lost my illusions...

Mme Benaut said...

LOL Nathalie - no-one is that brave around a Red Bellied Black Snake - not since we lost Steve Irwin that is. Even little Bindi would keep her distance unless it had been "milked".